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International Heat Transfer Conference 15

ISSN: 2377-424X (online)
ISSN: 2377-4371 (flashdrive)

Direct Numerical Simulation Modeling of Multidisciplinary Transport During Li-Ion Battery Charge/Discharge Processes

Fangming Jiang
Laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems, Guangdong Key Laboratory of New and Renewable Energy Research and Development, CAS Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Guangzhou 510640, China

Jianbang Zeng
Laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems, CAS Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)

Wei Wu
Laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems, CAS Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)

Peng Peng
Laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems, CAS Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)

DOI: 10.1615/IHTC15.mtr.009089
pages 5133-5147


KEY WORDS: Lithium-ion battery, Pore-scale model, Direct numerical simulation, Microstructure reconstruction, Multi-disciplinary transport.

Abstract

We develop a direct numerical simulation (DNS) model of multidisciplinary transport coupled with electrochemical reactions during Li-ion battery charge/discharge processes based on the finite volume (FV) numerical technique. Different from macroscopic models, the DNS model is based on microstructure of composite electrodes and solves component-wise transport equations. During DNS, the input physical properties are intrinsic material properties, not effective physical properties for macroscopic models. Since the interface of solid and electrolyte phase is evidently differentiated in DNS, the occurrence of electrochemical reactions is prescribed exactly on the interface of solid and electrolyte phase. Therefore, the DNS model has the potential to unravel the underlying mesoscopic pore-scale mechanisms of multi-disciplinary transport coupled with electrochemical reactions and thus can provide insightful information of the involved processes, as well as enables the design and optimization of electrodes, including microstructures inside electrodes. Two test cases, in which the electrode microstructures are reconstructed with a purely random reconstruction method and a previously developed sphere-based simulated annealing approach, respectively, are considered. Simulation results corroborate the capability and validity of the DNS model.

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